How to Grow Out Your Hair (Even When It’s Totally Fried)

Bella Nani-aromatouch technique
Welcome AromaTouch with Stephanie Duell!
January 20, 2017
Bella Nani-2017 Hairstyle Trends
Hairstyles That Will Be HUGE In 2017
January 31, 2017
Show all

How to Grow Out Your Hair (Even When It’s Totally Fried)

Balston Spa Salon

The process of growing out bleached hair or getting rid of fried ends can seem as tedious as watching grass grow. And since we don’t expect everyone to be down for a major pixie cut, we consulted colorists and stylists for their best tricks on how to deal.

“You need volume at the roots,” says Kyle White, colorist at the Oscar Blandi Salon in New York City. “When your roots look flat, it draws more attention to them, which draws more attention to the variations in color.” Some root-concealing styles he recommends include zigzag parts, messy updos, and loose ponytails. “You want to avoid strong parts, stick-straight hair, and anything that pulls the eye to the hair closest to your scalp,” he says. Hairstylist Kazu Suzuki, of Louis Licari Salon in New York City, opts for a little dry shampoo and teasing around the part, but feel free to experiment.

Roots might seem like the most obvious issue when growing out your hair. But the difference between dry, processed ends versus your natural regrowth—even if you blend the color—can give you away in an instant. Dana Ionato, a colorist at Sally Hershberger Downtown names coconut oil as her secret repair weapon. “There’s no right or wrong way to use it, wet or dry, but it will help with the texture,” she says. “My favorite trick is to drench your hair with the oil, concentrating it at your ends, flip your head over, twist it into a high topknot, and use the oil like a styling product to smooth flyaways.” This way, you’ll be conditioning all day long while still looking chic.

If you don’t want to go for a full-on pixie, we get it, but at least get trims to keep up with breakage—dyed or not. “The ends of long hair have been styled and colored so many times that they get dry and frizzy very quickly,” says hairstylist Serge Normant. If you snip off half an inch every other month, you’ll avoid the situation.

For the rest of this great article go to Allure.com

Comments are closed.